Race and Attraction, 2009 – 2014

OKTrends, OKCupid’s data blog, is back with another revealing look at how race plays into dating, proving once again what has been proven several times over: black women and black and asian men have it pretty damn tough in online dating.

euo:

[x]

I WNDHAHSHAHS RND

(Source: stanleykubricky)

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.

Links:

Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart

Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story

You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

The Struggle for Trans Liberation: A conversation with CeCe McDonald | Socialism Conference 2014

(Source: julianahuxtable)

fogo-av:

mentalalchemy:

nezua:

fnhfal:

Ferguson -2014

I blinked one day and when I opened my eyes, it was normal to have an American army battling Americans on American streets. No one even calls it a war. But it is.

Don’t forget this crazy shit actually happened.

Don’t forget this shit is STILL happening

paulhensleykingofgames said: so my girlfriend and i took a privilege quiz to see who had more. she had more than i did.. my girlfriend is black explain that "white privilege" shit

Literally made by the same ppl who think white privilege isn’t real. This is the equivalent of doing an online health quiz and then proceeding to tell your doctor that you don’t have stage 4 cancer and lab results were concocted by bleeding heart liberals. And you don’t have a black girlfriend. you don’t even have a girlfriend. chill

-CS

albinwonderland:

allthecanadianpolitics:

Aboriginal women ask Stephen Harper: Am I next?

Am I next?

That’s the question aboriginal women are asking Prime Minister Stephen Harper in a new online campaign to renew pressure on his government to call a national inquiry into murdered and missing indigenous women.

Coming on the heels of Harper’s "sociological phenomenon" blunder, the campaign is the brainchild of Holly Jarrett. She’s the cousin of Loretta Saunders, a 26-year-old Inuit student at Saint Mary’s University who was murdered earlier this year. At the time of her death, Saunders was working on her thesis on murdered and missing aboriginal women.

"She had come through a lot of the same kind of struggles that a lot women affected by colonialism and residential school stuff," Jarrett told PressProgress Friday, a day after  launching the Am I Next campaign.

"We wanted to move it forward for her. She was really passionate about telling her story, to stand up and tell the brutal truth," said Jarrett, an Inuit from the Labrador coast who’s now based in Hamilton, Ont.

After organizing one of the largest petitions at change.org calling on the government to launch a public inquiry into hundreds of missing and murdered aboriginal women, Jarrett decided to launch the Am I Next campaign.

It’s inspired by the Inuktitut word ain, a term of endearment for someone you love in her native language.

Here are some of the faces of the viral campaign:

This is what comes to mind when people try to tell me there is no (or less) racism in Canada. Hundreds of aboriginal and First Nations women are missing, abused, and murdered, and our country and GOVERNMENT doesn’t care. It doesn’t. Indigenous women don’t matter to our government and it’s horrifying.  Please click some of the above mentioned links and learn about these women and this campaign. 

nativenews:

Natives decolonize diet to fight diabetes, reconnect to land
[PHOTO: Rebecca Yoshino, director of the Shakopee Mdewakanton’s gardens, holds Dakota Corn in her hands Aug. 19, 2014 in Shakopee, Minn. American Indians are tackling obesity and diabetes by embracing ancient foods. Kyndell Harkness/Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT.]
Bit by bit, the farm at Little Earth of United Tribes is growing. So, too, is a movement among Native Americans across the nation to improve their health by rediscovering ancestral foods and connections to lands once lost.
“It’s growing in the last 10 years within the Native communities in the United States,” said Susen Fagrelius, coordinator of Little Earth’s community health initiatives. As more people realize they can grow a significant amount of vegetables on a small parcel of land, they discover that “they have the ability to take back their food system.”
Lakota sage appears where once ordinary grass grew. Rows of Oneida cornstalks tower 6 feet in the air. Raspberries cover a small patch of the farm.
When Indians were forced onto reservations, government commodities replaced the unprocessed, nutrient-rich foods they were used to eating, said Mihesuah, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma who runs the American Indian Health and Diet Project at the University of Kansas.
“Type 2 diabetes didn’t start showing up until after the Civil War,” she said. Through food, she wanted to “help our community and other native communities address acute and chronic conditions.”
The decolonized diet movement is spreading seeds nationwide. In New Mexico, indigenous food programs are working to preserve seeds from hundreds of years ago. Tribes in North Carolina are restoring native fruit and vegetable plants in newly established gardens.
The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community is at the forefront of these efforts. Lori Watso, a former public health nurse and Shakopee Tribe member, was the inspiration for the expansive garden and natural health store established on tribal land in Prior Lake, Minnesota.
Since starting in 2010, the garden has more than doubled in size.
Now in its fifth growing season, the 12-acre Wozupi has an orchard with trees bearing indigenous fruits – June berries, elderberries and wild plums. Goats and chickens roam the newly added Children’s Garden. There’s also a Heritage Garden, where ancient seeds given to them from other tribes grow.

nativenews:

Natives decolonize diet to fight diabetes, reconnect to land

[PHOTO: Rebecca Yoshino, director of the Shakopee Mdewakanton’s gardens, holds Dakota Corn in her hands Aug. 19, 2014 in Shakopee, Minn. American Indians are tackling obesity and diabetes by embracing ancient foods. Kyndell Harkness/Minneapolis Star Tribune/MCT.]

Bit by bit, the farm at Little Earth of United Tribes is growing. So, too, is a movement among Native Americans across the nation to improve their health by rediscovering ancestral foods and connections to lands once lost.

“It’s growing in the last 10 years within the Native communities in the United States,” said Susen Fagrelius, coordinator of Little Earth’s community health initiatives. As more people realize they can grow a significant amount of vegetables on a small parcel of land, they discover that “they have the ability to take back their food system.”

Lakota sage appears where once ordinary grass grew. Rows of Oneida cornstalks tower 6 feet in the air. Raspberries cover a small patch of the farm.

When Indians were forced onto reservations, government commodities replaced the unprocessed, nutrient-rich foods they were used to eating, said Mihesuah, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma who runs the American Indian Health and Diet Project at the University of Kansas.

“Type 2 diabetes didn’t start showing up until after the Civil War,” she said. Through food, she wanted to “help our community and other native communities address acute and chronic conditions.”

The decolonized diet movement is spreading seeds nationwide. In New Mexico, indigenous food programs are working to preserve seeds from hundreds of years ago. Tribes in North Carolina are restoring native fruit and vegetable plants in newly established gardens.

The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community is at the forefront of these efforts. Lori Watso, a former public health nurse and Shakopee Tribe member, was the inspiration for the expansive garden and natural health store established on tribal land in Prior Lake, Minnesota.

Since starting in 2010, the garden has more than doubled in size.

Now in its fifth growing season, the 12-acre Wozupi has an orchard with trees bearing indigenous fruits – June berries, elderberries and wild plums. Goats and chickens roam the newly added Children’s Garden. There’s also a Heritage Garden, where ancient seeds given to them from other tribes grow.

People aren’t talkin about the news, they’re talking about what they think the news is. There is no news channel saying “This is what happened, draw your own conclusions.” We have made this country so bereft of critical thinking, that now we have a problem where we have to teach them to think for themselves.

We have no unified authority, or problem solvers. We have congressman discussing environmentalism, when they don’t understand half the problems our earth is going through. We go to congress instead of going to people who have worked their whole LIFE trying to solve these problems. When it comes to racism, we’re asking a panel of white dudes, when it comes to sexism and woman’s rights we ask a panel of white priests on what they think. IT’S INSANITY! We ask people who are not in the arena they should be speaking in/for.

AND THAT’S WHY WE DON’T trust the media, it’s because they’re not in the arena of black experience, and they don’t care about the black experience, UNTIL something bad happens and they have the tools to paint us as destructive, ugly and evil!

Indigenous women’s lives held cheap in Canada

nitanahkohe:

…Earlier this year, a report prepared by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police found record of 1,181 cases of missing and murdered aboriginal women from 1980 to 2012. The RCMP report affirmed what many had long suspected: indigenous women “are over-represented among Canada’s murdered and missing women.”

The total was higher than previous independent estimates, and led to renewed calls for a national inquiry to determine the root causes of the problem. Activists argue the disproportionate number represents a failure by police and government to come up with a solution. The media, as well, has been criticized for its role. A 2010 study found depictions of murdered aboriginal women were “more detached in tone” and less likely to appear on the front page than those of white women.

Beverly Jacobs, a lawyer, activist, and the former head of the Native Women’s Association of Canada, has been trying to raise awareness about the problem for years. “It’s a crisis and it always has been,” she said, blaming all levels of government, including indigenous leadership. “The numbers indicate how critical an issue it is. The fact that indigenous women are being attacked — that’s historical. This isn’t a new issue. It’s been happening since the beginning of colonization.”

…Manitoba, a prairie province with one of Canada’s largest aboriginal populations, has some of the most troubling numbers. From 1980 to 2012, nearly half (49 percent) of female homicide victims were aboriginal, according to the RCMP report. Aboriginal people comprise 16.7 percent of the population of Manitoba.

Bernadette Smith, a tall, strongly built woman with soft brown eyes, has become a leading voice among aboriginal activists in the province since her own sister, Claudette Osborne, went missing…“We’re all just people. We have families, we have a world, and we’re not disposable,” Smith said. Smith, an education consultant on aboriginal issues, has been pushing for better social programs geared toward at-risk women that would help them to break away from a cycle of drug addiction and violent relationships.

The RCMP report found that most of the homicides were “committed by men and most of the perpetrators knew their victims — whether as an acquaintance or a spouse.” Twelve percent of the victims were involved in the sex trade…“Women aren’t just on the street because they want to be,” Smith says. “They all have a story to tell.”

Anonymous said: So a cop, a racist, and a murderer walk into a bar. And that's just the first guy.

yoisthisracist:

I get this joke.

Suddenly her mom’s silence matched Jackie’s own. “Oh, my God,” she murmured in disbelief. “Are you gay?”

"Yeah," Jackie forced herself to say.

After what felt like an eternity, her mom finally responded. “I don’t know what we could have done for God to have given us a fag as a child,” she said before hanging up.

[…]

She got a call from her older brother. “He said, ‘Mom and Dad don’t want to talk to you, but I’m supposed to tell you what’s going to happen,’” Jackie recalls. “And he’s like, ‘All your cards are going to be shut off, and Mom and Dad want you to take the car and drop it off at this specific location. Your phone’s going to last for this much longer. They don’t want you coming to the house, and you’re not to contact them. You’re not going to get any money from them. Nothing. And if you don’t return the car, they’re going to report it stolen.’ And I’m just bawling. I hung up on him because I couldn’t handle it.” Her brother was so firm, so matter-of-fact, it was as if they already weren’t family.

lastrealindians:

Sex, Drugs and Blood Money on the Rez, By Ruth Hopkins

…Some of the outsiders coming onto our reservations are pimps and sex offenders. Sexual violence against Native women is already an epidemic. One Native women in three is sexually assaulted in her lifetime, and although it’s seldom discussed, sex trafficking has been a problem in the Dakotas for years. The oil boom has amplified it. Native women and girls who fall between the cracks are lured by men into sex work, or even sold by male relatives.

Thankfully, Senators Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) and Jon Tester (D-MT) have called attention to sex trafficking and taken action to combat it, but prevention can’t happen soon enough. As camps brought by Big Oil spring up on treaty lands, we’ll see more sexual violence perpetrated against Native women. The reauthorized Violence against Women Act, which includes provisions for Natives, will assist tribes in fighting domestic abuse and sex crimes, but it doesn’t take full effect until March 7, 2015. Tribes cannot prosecute non-Indian abusers until that date and even then participation is not mandatory.

The Department of Justice’s Office on Violence against Women recently announced the release of three million dollars in grants to aid VAWA with Native provisions. That is seed money, but it won’t be enough, especially if the Keystone XL pipeline is implemented. South Dakota legislators must step up to the plate for Native women and take a strong stance in support of fighting sex trafficking in their state. Sen. Heitkamp (D-ND), Sen. Tester (D-MT), and Sen. Thune (R-SD) should all be questioned as to how they justify backing the Transcanada Keystone XL pipeline when it’s implementation will only make sex trafficking throughout the Northern Plains worse.

Politicians talk out of both sides of their mouths all the time, but that doesn’t mean Natives can’t call them on it and use our voting power to influence their decisions. As the Bakken oil boom peaks and fades, we will continue to see a rise in crime, in substance abuse, in sex trafficking, and in violence against Native women. We must act now to protect Native communities, and work toward educating tribal members on finance management. Above all, we must remember that no amount of money is worth the lives of our sisters.

READ MORE HERE: http://lastrealindians.com/sex-drugs-and-blood-money-on-the-rez-by-ruth-hopkins/